Sunday, September 27, 2009

THE OZONE LAYER DEPLETION: HOW IT CONTRIBUTE TO CLIMATE CHANGE/GLOBAL WARMING




The above image is a view of the most recent Antarctic ozone hole, derived from NASA's satellite measurements that monitor the ozone layer. CLIMATE CHANGE change may cause the ozone hole to expand further.

By: LOPE COLUMNA
KABBALIST-ENGINEER
COLUMNA MESSIANIC RESEARCH, Inc.



The EFFECTS OF OZONE, CFC’S, AND CO2


The "ozone hole" is a severe depletion of the ozone layer high above Antarctica. It is primarily caused by human-produced compounds that release chlorine and bromine gases in the stratosphere. The ozone layer acts to protect life on Earth by blocking harmful ultraviolet rays from the sun.

Ozone is actually a greenhouse gas, and so are CFCs. This means that their presence in the troposphere contributes slightly to the heightened greenhouse effect. 

But the main greenhouse gas responsible for the current global warming problem is carbon dioxide. The sources of this CO2 came from the burning of fossil fuels for electricity, heating, and transportation. 

THE OZONE AS GOOD AND EVIL

Ozone plays two different roles in the atmosphere. Placed near the ground Ozone is bad and harmful; it is a pollutant caused by human activities. "BAD OZONE" a major component of health-damaging smog. 

If you place ozone high above in the stratosphere, the ozone becomes "GOOD OZONE" and acts as a shield, filtering out most of the ultraviolet light from the Sun that is harmful to people, animals, and plants.

The EARTH'S LAYERS OF ATMOSPHERE

The Earth's layers of atmosphere differ in chemical composition and temperature. They combine to create a protective shield that maintains our delicate energy balance essential for life on Earth. Most weather occurs in the nearest layer, the troposphere (0-7 miles). 

The stratosphere is the level where jet airliners fly and the ozone layer resides (7-30 miles). Beyond that is the coldest part of the atmosphere, the mesosphere where only large helium balloons fly (30-50 miles). Finally, the thermosphere gradually fades into space (50-180 miles). 

High up in the atmosphere, the loss of stratospheric ozone caused some cooling in that layer of the atmosphere. A much larger effect comes from carbon dioxide, which acts as a cooling agent in the stratosphere, while it warms the atmosphere close to ground level. This paradox happens because the atmosphere becomes thin as you go up. This change the way carbon dioxide molecules absorb and release heat.

Together, the increase in carbon dioxide and the loss of ozone layer caused the record-low temperatures in the stratosphere and still higher up in the thermosphere. This cooling is not good, and it is another sign that increasing levels of carbon dioxide are changing our earth’s climate.


-- LOPE COLUMNA --


1 comment:

Anonymous said...

I just like the helpful info you provide to your articles.
I will bookmark your weblog and take a look at once more here
regularly. I'm slightly sure I will be told a lot of new stuff right here!
Best of luck for the following!

My website ... Steven McIntire